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20121112
20121120
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
with abc news last week, house speaker john boehner said this about immigration reform. quote, while i believe it's important for us to secure our borders and enforce our laws, i think a comprehensive approach is long overdue and i'm confident myself, the president and others can find the common ground to take care of this issue once and for all. later he tried to backout after he was called out by conservative tea party bloggers as well as conservative members of congress. this a sign that the tea party isn't quite over yet? >> and it's not. and i think sometimes the people who are left are the most extreme. and they're going the double down. and again, we're seeing this in indiana, for example, in texas, a little bit in georgia. so the people who are left are going to give it their all. but where we're going to see in the next two to three years is the pressure of needing to get electoral gains there is only so many elections you can lose before you change course. and that's going happen. maybe they can hang on for another two years. but beyond that, the math doesn't add up for repub
't, toure. some complementary things said from an aide close to speaker boehner saying it was a very productive, positive meeting there with the president at the white house. the most interesting thing, though, from the boehner aide was that john boehner believes there is not enough time from now until the end of the year to actually have a grand bargain. there's enough time, though, to put together the framework for what a grand bargain would look like. essentially have the top lines agreed to that by sometime in 2013 you could have both the chambers, the senate and the house, come together on some substantial tax reform, entitlement reform, and get rid of the sort of automatic cuts that we see as a sequester, and the tax increases and have a mechanism you can replace them with. listen to the congressional leaders in their photo op in the white house before thanksgiving that they had today. >> we've put revenue on the table, as long as it's accompanied by significant spending cuts. >> we have a cornerstones of being able to work something out. we're both going to have to give up som
connell, who's the senate minority leader, he's taking a tougher stand than even boehner. let's listen to both of those positions. >> let's be clear. an opening bid of $1.6 trillion in new taxes just isn't serious. it's more than simpson/bowles or any other bipartisan commission has called for. it's been unanimously rejected in the house and senate. it's twice as much as the white house agreed to last summer during the debt ceiling talks, and looked at in the context of the spending cuts yet to be implemented, it amounts to about 20 cents in cuts for every new dollar in tax hikes. in other words, no cuts at all. it's a joke. a joke. >> we right away say 98% of americans are not going to see their taxes go up. 97% of small businesses are not going to see their taxes go up. if we get that in place, we are actually removing half of the fiscal cliff. half of the danger to our economy is removed by that single step. >> okay. so is it a joke, or as the democrats would say, the math isn't adding up? let's look at the issue of deficit reduction. the democrats say the -- let's say if you cut loopholes
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)